Category: Trademarks

Brand Tough?: Ford Denied Well-Known Trademark Protection in Russia

Today, I posted on The IPKat about Ford Motor Company’s recent trademark troubles in Russia as the Federal Service for Intellectual Property (Rospatent) denied Ford well-known trademark protection for its company name and iconic blue oval logo. Particularly, I discussed how Ford’s denial of well-known trademark protection was not such a result of Russia’s precarious IP protection environment, or even Ford’s non-use of their name or logo in Russia, but that it likely failed to comply with Rospatent’s procedural registration requirements.

It is available here.

Fund and Done: Avoiding IP Risks in Crowdfunding Campaigns

Today, I posted on the Washington Lawyers for the Arts Blog about domestic and cross-border IP risks in crowdfunding campaigning. Particularly, I discussed how a US biotech company’s recent Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign was derailed by a trademark dispute and what crowdfunding campaigners can do to protect themselves against domestic and foreign IP risks. The posting is available here. Enjoy!

 

Interested in Crowdfunding?

For those who are interested in IP and other legal issues surrounding crowdfunding, I will be speaking on a panel at the Washington Lawyers for the Arts and Seattle University of School of Law‘s seminar entitled Crowdfunding 101: Funding Your Passion on September 19, 2014. Particularly, I will be presenting on the legal obligations and risks fundraising campaigners sign onto through the terms of use on major crowdfunding platforms such as Kickstarter, Indiegogo and GoFundMe. Further information on attending the seminar can be found here.

Hope you can make it. It should be fun!

IP and Business Presentation in Vancouver, B.C.

Wanted to let you all know that my colleague Rachel Buker (blogger for Art and Artifice) and I will be giving a free lunch-time presentation on IP and business legal issues Canadian entrepreneurs, start-ups and other businesses may face as they enter the U.S. market (and other foreign markets) on September 12th at noon at HiVE Vancouver.

There are only a few open spots available, so if you are going to be in Vancouver and want to attend, please RSVP through Eventbrite.

Hope you can make it! It should be a good time.

The Blue Jay Trademark Battle Commences…

It is getting to be my favorite time of year sports-wise when U.S. college and professional football starts up again, which then transitions seamlessly into the U.S. college basketball season before bittersweetly ending with March Madness in the Spring. Sufficed to say, I am not a big baseball fan.

To commemorate this changing of the sport seasons, check out my post today on The IPKat about the U.S. trademark dispute between Canada’s only Major League Baseball team, the Toronto Blue Jays, and Omaha, Nebraska’s Creighton University over Creighton’s new logo for its mascot Billie Bluejay.

It is available at: http://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2014/08/the-blue-jay-trade-mark-battle-commences.html.

USTR Requesting Public Comments to Assist in Identifying Foreign IP Protection Barriers for U.S. Exports

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) announced yesterday that it is requesting public comments to assist the USTR in identifying significant barriers to U.S. exports of goods and services, including foreign IP protection deficiencies. The comments are being collected for inclusion in the USTR’s annual National Trade Estimate Report on Foreign Trade Barriers (NTE Report) that identifies barriers to U.S. exports including the “lack of intellectual property protection (e.g., inadequate patent, copyright, and trademark regimes).”

Last year’s NTE Report identified several U.S. export markets as possessing IP protection trade barriers, or at least IP protection concerns, including Angola, Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Brazil, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, European Union (member states), Ghana, Guatemala, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Israel, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Laos, Malaysia, Mexico, Morocco, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan and Venezuela.

Public comments for inclusion in this year’s NTE Report are due to the USTR by no later that October 29, 2014. Further instructions on the NTE public comment submission process are available here.

European Commission Reports on Annual Counterfeit Customs Enforcement; Counterfeits by Mail Being Increasingly Targeted

Check out my post today on The IPKat about the European Commission’s recent annual report on EU counterfeit enforcement efforts and how EU customs authorities and rights holders have recently increased their efforts to stop the flow of counterfeit goods arriving by mail into the EU.

It is available at: http://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2014/08/ec-reports-on-annual-counterfeit.html.

 

 

 

Whac-A-Mole Trademark Litigation: Using U.S. Trademark Litigation to Combat Foreign Counterfeiters

Check out my post today on The IPKat about a number of similar recent U.S. trademark cases brought by well-known U.S. and Canadian brands against foreign (predominately Chinese) counterfeiters in order to stem the flow of inbound online counterfeit sales into the U.S.

It is available at: http://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2014/07/whac-mole-trade-mark-litigation-using.html.

Cross-Border Canadian Trademark Case May Come Down To Concurrent Use Considerations

Check out my post today on The IPKat about The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ Canadian trademark litigation against a British Columbia-based Mormon fundamentalist group that will likely be determined by concurrent use considerations.

It is available at: http://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2014/07/lds-church-and-mormon-fundamentalist.html.